Normal service resumed, the blends are back!

Tell us about the latest beans you've discovered and blends you've tried

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Normal service resumed, the blends are back!

Postby simonp » Mon Aug 01, 2005 12:05 pm

Last week I got back to the blending experiments. The latest one is based on a good old Jim Schulman one again, but with a little twist.

This is supposed to be a typical lighter bodied Italian style espresso (no big heavy Indonesians in there).

34g Harrar (Hasbean), 33g Guatamalan Antigua (Sweet Marias), 79g Yuaco Selecto (Sweet Marias), 79g 50/50 mix Brazil Cachoera (Hasbean) & Brazil Carmo Estate (Sweet Marias), and finally my own addition of 20g Nanga Farms robusta (Sweet Marias).

I roasted the lot together as I was feeling lazy, and also didn't want too many beans on my hands from lots of batches. Besides, I quite like the flavour mix of a pre-blend roast sometimes, as long as the beans are not too different in roast characteristic, which I find is less of an issue with the drum roast method.

I took this to the edge of 2nd crack gaining pace so as not to under-roast the slower beans, about 35 seconds after the first snaps. There was no oil showing, but most beans had a smooth surface. There were a few small spots after 4 days.

I used a mix of the dry procesed Cachoera and the semi wet Carmo Brazils, as I understand that a mix of Brazils are quite common in espresso blends. The Cach is very sweet, and the Carmo has nuts and chocolate I added the robusta (yuk! I hear some of you call) to add a little kick.
The Nanga farms is sweet and smooth (for a robusta), but withgood body and bottom notes, it also roasts quite quickly so works well in a pre-blend roast.
The Yuaco is perhaps a little pricey for a blend, but it is one used often by Jim Schulman, and I got such nice straight shots with this bean before, I had to try it in there. I guess maybe a good columbian could be used instead, or perhaps a low acidity Mexican?

I waited 3 days and then gave it a go. Lots of crema from this one, the robusta really helping here. The taste is lighter than my previous blends, but not lacking in flavour. There is a lot of sweetness here. The Brazils and the Yuaco all are sweet beans. The robusta added a good kick, and worked well with the liquorice from the Guatamalan. The Harrar just does what it always does, I just love this stuff in espresso :) .

Makes good cappas, the thick crema means even I can do a rosetta of sorts, and there is enough bite to work with the milk, and the sweetness comes through. Too mild for a Late I expect (not that I ever drink them, Erghh :evil: )
Profitec 700 dual boiler
Isomac Rituale
Mazzer Mini
Mahlkonig Vario
Chemex
Aeropress
2 Bodum press pots
Hottop updated to a B with Compuetr control
Imex roaster, dimmer mod on heater (under spare bed)
Rival popper, with split motor and dimmer mod on heater (retired)
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Postby Beanie » Mon Aug 01, 2005 1:41 pm

Glad you're back :) Never know what you're missing til its gone :)

When you pre-blend, do you let them get acquainted with each other in a communal home (bag) for xxx hours/days before you actually roast them? Or are they super friendly and just get along straight off in the drum?

Another one, if one of the beans were to roast too ultra-fast compared to the others, would it be prudent to dump the faster-roasting or softer bean in 30-60 seconds later? Or would that be too big of a danger for baked rather than roasted beans?

Thanks,
M
This week, I'm mainly recovering :DAll I've got is my Aerobie AeroPress | 70's Aurora/Brugnetti HX Spring Lever | Mazzer Mini E & SJ (on loan) | Hottop | Nestor Martin (Toto) Gas Roaster | Eva Solo | Moka Pots
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Postby simonp » Mon Aug 01, 2005 2:28 pm

When you pre-blend, do you let them get acquainted with each other in a communal home (bag) for xxx hours/days before you actually roast them? Or are they super friendly and just get along straight off in the drum?


Not very often, I usually decide what to do just before I roast, but it would be better to let the moisture content even out for a while. I tend to pick beans that are not so different in roast time to use together if I can, or a bean that can take a lighter roast and still taste OK if it is a slow roaster. As an example the Brazil Cach and Harrar roast very well together both being dry processed, and Indonesians (even dry processed ones) go well with wet processed beans as they take longer to roast.

Due to the slower temperature ramp at the start with a drum roaster like the Hottop they tend to even out reasonably anyway.

Another one, if one of the beans were to roast too ultra-fast compared to the others, would it be prudent to dump the faster-roasting or softer bean in 30-60 seconds later? Or would that be too big of a danger for baked rather than roasted beans?


I have heard of some people doing this, I suppose there is the potential danger of the chamber being too hot for dumping the beans in to and scorching them if you left it too long. I think this would require quite a bit of experimentation to get right. I might give this a go at some point. Things like the Cach and Harar might benefit from going in a bit later and having a little less roast.
Profitec 700 dual boiler
Isomac Rituale
Mazzer Mini
Mahlkonig Vario
Chemex
Aeropress
2 Bodum press pots
Hottop updated to a B with Compuetr control
Imex roaster, dimmer mod on heater (under spare bed)
Rival popper, with split motor and dimmer mod on heater (retired)
User avatar
simonp
 
Posts: 1910
Joined: Thu Apr 08, 2004 9:14 am
Location: Wiltshire, UK


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