Freshroasted coffee always needs to rest, even for Vacpot?

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Freshroasted coffee always needs to rest, even for Vacpot?

Postby Coffee Maniac » Mon Jan 22, 2007 5:04 pm

I was just thinking... I know tha beans need to rest like 48 hours or so after the roast before you can get a really good espresso from them.

But does this apply to all coffee or just espresso?
How about drip/presspot/vacpot?
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Postby Aadje » Mon Jan 22, 2007 5:10 pm

we all say it needs to degass, but if you like it better before degassing, or while degassing, no problem :) it's very interesting how the taste of the coffee evolves with time. I'm sure you can taste that even in drip/press/vac
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Postby bruceb » Mon Jan 22, 2007 5:11 pm

This "degassing" phase allows the CO2 to escape from the beans. I recently discovered that using the beans immediately after roasting gives a very acidic cup which makes sense as the CO2 is there and makes the coffee rather fizzy like soda. I only make espresso, but I would imagine this would be true anyway you brew. It's not necesarilly bad, but maybe not everyone's cup of errrrrm coffee. :P
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Postby Coffee Maniac » Mon Jan 22, 2007 5:40 pm

That is what I thought. It was just that I had it in the back of my head "if you are going to make espresso the coffee needs to rest...". :)
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Postby zix » Mon Jan 22, 2007 6:34 pm

To me, beans do not need to rest as long when making vac pot, presso or aeropress as they need for espresso. Say 6-12 hours. Of course, it is individual for every type of bean and you must try it for yourself, but in general, less rest is needed. For me.
For turkish coffee it is common to do it all once - roast, grind as soon as the beans have cooled down, then make the coffee.
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Postby Coffee Maniac » Mon Jan 22, 2007 7:06 pm

OK, cool. :)
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Postby ivdp » Tue Jan 23, 2007 8:30 am

If you want to wait but really want to, start grinding your beans, the process goes much quicker.
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Postby Bertie_Doe » Tue Jan 23, 2007 9:23 am

zix wrote
For turkish coffee it is common to do it all once - roast, grind as soon as the beans have cooled down, then make the coffee.

In September, I was in Turkey, after the meal, the waiter always says "Nescafe?". Once I replied "No Turkish coffee please". - It was the grittiest coffee I'd ever tasted, you could almost eat it!

ivdp wrote
start grinding your beans, the process goes much quicker.

Grinding early would release the gasses quicker, but how long would you want to wait before brewing - perhaps an hour or two? Dunno, I've never tried it.
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Postby Aadje » Tue Jan 23, 2007 11:00 am

I'm allways a fan of just tasing it :) see if you like and if you don't wait a bit longer, very intersting.
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Postby bruceb » Tue Jan 23, 2007 12:01 pm

I just did an experiment: I drank an espresso made from my lovely Yirgacheffe Mocca immediately after roasting. It was really bubbly and acidic, almost like a new wine. To get a 60 ml double I had to pull over 90 ml because of the Guiness effect. I then ground some more, let it stand in the doser for about 90 minutes and then pulled another shot. It still showed some of the Guiness effect, but not as much as before and the taste was quite different. Much of the sprightly acidity was gone and it was more chocolaty, deeper and more mellow. I then pulled a third shot from freshly ground beans (without letting it stand in the doser) and it was just like the first.

This is what Ivo said, grinding it speeds up the degassing process. Ninety minutes seems to be fine. This may vary for different beans and roasts, of course.
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Postby Terje » Sun Jan 28, 2007 2:32 pm

I prefer the coffee right away. I roast, grind and brew in one process for each cup. My mom doesn't ahve the time and she has beans from the day before or older at home. I think my coffee is better than hers, but it could also be the water.

I have no espresso machine at home, I use either a moka pot, press pot or make turkish coffee (recently bought a vacuum pot too) and it seems to me all of these taste better if I make the coffee right away. I bring some to work in the mornings and I think the coffee I have in the mornings and evening is better.

I recently got a roasting pot that makes it easier for me to roast a lot of beans and I think I'll experiment more with the time in the future.
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Postby wvb » Mon Jan 29, 2007 7:57 pm

that's good to know
just got me a fresh pack that was roasted today at noon and thought it tasted weird
with my limited knowledge I couldn't define it, guess that's what they call acid then :)
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Postby Aadje » Mon Jan 29, 2007 8:39 pm

Terje, for *each* cup you roast a small batch of beans, grind them while still warm and make coffee out of it? So 1 cup costs you about 1/2 an hour?

Wietse, you'll learn soon enough :)
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Postby Terje » Tue Jan 30, 2007 5:40 am

No, no, it takes me about 15 minutes! :D

I have this raosting pan with a little handle that you use to stir the beans, just got it from a shop that has thrown away antique stuff. The metal is thin and it heats up pretty fast.

If you do this for every cup you'll get used to it soon enouhg and you'll know what you can do while the pan is heating up. I usually wash a little dishes.
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Postby GeorgeW » Tue Jan 30, 2007 11:20 am

Terje wrote:No, no, it takes me about 15 minutes! :D

I have this raosting pan with a little handle that you use to stir the beans, just got it from a shop that has thrown away antique stuff. The metal is thin and it heats up pretty fast.

If you do this for every cup you'll get used to it soon enouhg and you'll know what you can do while the pan is heating up. I usually wash a little dishes.


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