Tell me of your Aeropress, O'sul

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Tell me of your Aeropress, O'sul

Postby Bassclef » Thu Sep 14, 2006 11:52 am

Err - forget the silly movie reference (name it anyone?) but honestly - I had read the word Aeropress in the signature of several people, seen it mentioned, and have now gone to the website to have a look at their very gonzo advertising...

Something just seems a little too good to be true. Are these presses able to produce the kind of espresso that we all love and enjoy? Or is there something smelly in (sorry to you Danish out there!) Denmark?

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Postby dliefbroer » Thu Sep 14, 2006 12:03 pm

Usul or Muadib.
The mouse shape on the moon (or the mouse in the desert depending on movie or series). Tell me of your homeworld.

Need to find out about the Aerpress myself.
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Postby scook94 » Thu Sep 14, 2006 12:41 pm

Read the thread on CoffeeGeek and you'll see much debate over Aerobie's use of the word "espresso", so much so that they promised to stop using it. It doesn't (IMHO) produce the espresso you are referring to, BUT it does produce an excellent "base" for an Americano style coffee. (Which is what I use it for.)

I can only recommend you get your hands on one and let us know what you think.
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Postby Steve » Thu Sep 14, 2006 1:15 pm

I agree with Scook it aint espresso but its a fine brewing method in its own right.
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Postby Gouezeri » Thu Sep 14, 2006 1:23 pm

Agree with all of the above... and in my opinion a great reliable way to make a very clean cup... definitely my preferred option over French Press or Moka. I'd ignore all the questions/comments about what "kind" of coffee it makes and focus on all of the people (including a number of the pros here) who own one and use it regularly. I used mine all summer when camping in the Alps and have kept using it now that I'm home. Personally, I prefer it for an americano type drink.
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Postby Bassclef » Thu Sep 14, 2006 2:52 pm

I guess it has it's place then, this Aerobie... but for me, any Americano type drinks I make would start from an espresso anyway... and considering the expense I am about to go through to get myself what I want - that place may not be in my home.

(thanks dliefbroer for pointing out my 'Irishing' of Usul's name! I should stick to my day job, I know...)

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Postby Bassclef » Thu Sep 14, 2006 2:53 pm

I wonder if they have measured the furthest glide distant for an Aeropress however? I bet you could get at least 30 meters!

;-)
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Postby zix » Thu Sep 14, 2006 5:05 pm

Well, cylindrical shapes do tend to be good throwers if you get a bit of rotation into the throw...
It couldn't replace the espresso machine, but it has replaced my moka pots and surpasses every french press I have tried so far. I even prefer it to the brikka, even though I confess I like the brikka brew a lot. They taste very different, but I wouldn't say one is better than the other.
For me, the aeropress has these advantages:
1. Convenient to travel with. It shares this property with the moka pot, but beats it slightly, since you don´t need a heater for it. Hot water in a thermos or heated with one of those dedicated water heaters will do nicely.
2. Wide spectrum of acceptable coffees due to easily variable brew temp and time. It shares this advantage with the french press (but I don't know of anyone makes use of it in the FP. There is bound to be one here on TMC though).
3. The hot water passes the grounds - they do not stay in the cup/brewer, thus avoiding overextraction and bitter taste. This happens also in an espresso machine or drip brew, and in the vac pot.
4. It extracts a lot of taste, and you can make the coffee strong. It shares this aspect with moka pot, french press and espresso machine, and betters them all but for the espresso machine.

As you can see, it is not alone in any particular advantage, but no other brewer has all of them.
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Postby espressomattic » Thu Sep 14, 2006 6:13 pm

SInce whenis it used for making coffee? I have used it for....better stop there ;)
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Postby Paul L » Thu Sep 14, 2006 7:09 pm

BC, I think of it as instant coffee made properly and would not be without it. I don't always want that espresso (capps in my case) hit and want the spoon & jar (purely as an analogy!) kind of water based coffee with a little cold milk added. Every day that I go to the office or simply out at the weekend I take the home roasts out and put together the blend for the day, grind it to the same setting as for my espresso, into one of the sealable sandwich bags and off I go. This is my staple diet week-in week-out to complement the dedicated brews on the Brewtus at home and allows me to bypass the café culture out there. Except watching the World (and the girlies) go by is still nice to do so I order tea when being sociable with colleagues.

No the Aerobie is not too good to be true but no it's not expresso as others have said.
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Postby scook94 » Thu Sep 14, 2006 8:25 pm

Bassclef wrote:[snip]... and considering the expense I am about to go through to get myself what I want - that place may not be in my home.

[snip]

Marc


Indeed that may be the case, and for several months after getting my Vivi I drank almost exclusively espresso based drinks, but as Jim points out in his latest blog article, there are many other excellent ways to enjoy coffee. For me, the reason that the Aeropress tops them (apart from the quality of the cup it produces) is it's ease of use, including the "clean-up" process, and as others have hinted at it is incredibly portable and easy to use outside the home. I would have been lost without it when I was abroad this summer.

I hope that once you have your home set-up sorted you do consider adding an Aeropress to your coffee making arsenal....
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Postby Jacob » Fri Sep 15, 2006 6:33 am

To me the Aeropress has meant I now get good coffee at work and when traveling. I don't think it can really compete with a well made espresso based Americano, or if you nail a yirg in the French press (does it get any better?), so I don't use it at home. I agree with others that it is a nice new twist on coffee preparation. It does make a good coffee. But I mainly have it due to convenience and portability.

And then it is there to be bought and it's cheap compared to all the other coffee stuff we buy (how much was you tamper again?) ;-)
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Postby Bassclef » Fri Sep 15, 2006 9:22 am

Pretty impressive support for a device that looks like...err... something that I maybe shouldn't mention! (anyone else notice it's resemblance to male...errr...enhancement devices? There.. I mentioned it!) And at the price it's almost an impulse buy item - I will go deep and source myself one as my proper machine is still a couple months away...

I have a couple very good friends from Italy who will not go ANYWHERE without their little electric Moka - their home is littered with moka pots, and they drink coffee in the mornings religiously. When they next visit - I would LOVE to see their faces if I brought that out! They are, like many Italians I have met, very proud and passionate of their Italian coffee 'mythos' and tradition - I am willing to bet they will not be impressed until they taste it!

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Postby Gouezeri » Fri Sep 15, 2006 10:50 am

I must admit, I did get some funny looks this summer when using mine (for its intended purpose, nothing else! :wink: ) in an italian campsite. That said, people were more suprised when I plugged the electric grinder into the inverter on the car and started grinding away :D And before any of you lot criticise me for not using a zass, when you're carrying 15kg worth of cameras and gear up to over 3000m altitude, you deserve some luxuries back at camp, and not having to grind beans by hand is one of mine :P
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Postby GeorgeW » Fri Sep 15, 2006 2:50 pm

Used mine for real this morning and, while the coffee was good I was disappointed at the quantity. I usually use a Moka and have a mug full for breakfast.
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