Saeco Odea Giro or DeLonghi Magnifica Rapid Capuccino Maker

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Saeco Odea Giro or DeLonghi Magnifica Rapid Capuccino Maker

Postby lrheeza » Sat Dec 24, 2011 1:41 am

Hi Everyone -

I'm a new member and planning to buy an espresso maker. Is a Saeco Odea Giro or Delonghi Rapid Capuccino Maker ESAM 3300 model better?

Your inputs are very much appreciated.
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RE: Saeco Odea Giro or DeLonghi Magnifica Rapid Capuccino Ma

Postby bruceb » Sat Dec 24, 2011 12:07 pm

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... and merry Christmas while we're at it.

I doubt whether anyone on this forum is familiar with either of those machines. As an alternative you might consider looking at eBay for a good, used Gaggia or Rancilio Silvia. Also, consider a good used grinder since no espresso machine can produce good results without good, freshly ground beans. Oh yes, beans. A fresh packet from a good supplier every 10-14 days is also pretty much a prerequisite, too.

I guess that should give you a headache for Christmas :oops:. Sorry. Happy New Year, too.
Three Francesconi (CMA) espresso machines - Rossi, San Marco, LaCimbali, Faema and 2 Mazzer Major grinders- CoffeeTech Maggionlino, Hottop, Alpenröst and HW Precision roasters.
I decided I needed a bit of a change so I roasted some Monsooned Malabar. That was a change!
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RE: Saeco Odea Giro or DeLonghi Magnifica Rapid Capuccino Ma

Postby fluffykiwi » Sat Dec 24, 2011 2:29 pm

can only agree. just got first grinder and producing better espresso even though I dont think it is optimally dialled in yet......love the experimenting though!
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RE: Saeco Odea Giro or DeLonghi Magnifica Rapid Capuccino Ma

Postby Aadje » Sat Dec 24, 2011 8:25 pm

Welcome Irheeza.

As advice, I can say I agree with Bruce.
Bits 'n' pieces . . .

This week I am mainly saying hello to old friends
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RE: Saeco Odea Giro or DeLonghi Magnifica Rapid Capuccino Ma

Postby lrheeza » Sat Dec 24, 2011 8:49 pm

merrry christmas to all! :)

i thought those machines comes with grinders already! :)

any suggestions for good beans?
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RE: Saeco Odea Giro or DeLonghi Magnifica Rapid Capuccino Ma

Postby Aadje » Tue Dec 27, 2011 4:10 pm

Anything from Hasbean, anything from Square Mile, or ask your favourite coffee bar.
Bits 'n' pieces . . .

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Re: RE: Saeco Odea Giro or DeLonghi Magnifica Rapid Capuccin

Postby bruceb » Wed Dec 28, 2011 3:14 pm

lrheeza wrote:i thought those machines comes with grinders already! :)


Sorry to have not followed up this post. Both of the machines you named are bean-to-cup machines. Yes, they have built-in grinders. You put coffee beans and water in the top (not necessarily together) and something else come out down below.

There must be hundreds of bean-to-cup machines these days and regardless of price they all have serious limitations. It makes no difference, aside from possible aesthetic differences, whether you spend 200 GBP or 2000 GBP the results are not comparable to what can be obtained with a good grinder and almost any standard espresso machine operated by a person who has learned to make good coffee.

There are commercial bean-to-cup machines that cost upwards of 5000 GBP and the same applies to them, unless a person who has learned to make good coffee keeps a constant watch over the machine and adjusts and cleans it accordingly.

The reasons for this are not magical or difficult to describe. To begin with, setting the grind (how coarse or fine) requires understanding of the effect the grind has on the cup. A grind that is too coarse will produce a weak and sourish cup, a grind that is too fine will choke the pump or at best the result will be overextracted and bitter. A machine cannot be expected to be able to analyse the cup and make adjustments accordingly. Although home bean-to-cup machines do allow some adjustment of the grind it is not adequate because none of them can grind fine enough (this is intentional on the part of the manufacturer to avoid choking the pump). Also, the filling and tamping of the filter basket requires a certain degree of learning and feel and again, a simple (affordable) machine cannot do this. What's more, these machines have no reliable temperature regulation. The first cup may be 98°C and after five or six cups the temperature may be down to 85°C, or the other way, depending upon the design of the heating and extraction system. Good espresso extraction requires stable temperature control. Thermal-block heaters cannot provide this stability.

The bean-to-cup machine has enjoyed great popularity and it may be that the coffee they produce is better than what many home filter machines can produce, but it is not comparable to a cup made by a (home) barista on a classical espresso machine.

If, in spite of this this, you decide that a bean-to-cup machine is the best answer for your use, and that is a valid and personal opinion, then the best advice anyone can give you is to use freshly roasted (no later than 14-days after roasting) beans from a reputable supplier.

Good luck and let us know how things work out for you and your coffee. :D
Three Francesconi (CMA) espresso machines - Rossi, San Marco, LaCimbali, Faema and 2 Mazzer Major grinders- CoffeeTech Maggionlino, Hottop, Alpenröst and HW Precision roasters.
I decided I needed a bit of a change so I roasted some Monsooned Malabar. That was a change!
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